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The Confetti Project: Sharina Lets Her Voice Speak for Itself

Creators

Jelena Aleksich | October 13, 2017
This bicoastal singer-songwriter takes an experimental approach to performing, impressing crowds at galleries and parties in NYC and L.A.

What is the vision behind your work?

I want to offer a different perspective on the woman experience. Sure, there’s nothing new under the sun, but I know the way I sing and write are crafted through my hands and voice, which no one can take from me. I want my music and art to bring women’s uncomfortable truths to light and show them that love is still offered and that we are truly the superheroes we read about as children.

“I know the way I sing and write are crafted through my hands and voice, which no one can take from me.”

What are you inspired by?

A couple of years ago, I probably would’ve answered this question with examples of love movies and cool trips I’ve taken, but I realize that what inspires me and fuels me today is to be less scared than I was yesterday. So, in a weird way, my fears inspire me. They’re like these little alarm clocks that go off to remind me that I’m human and I still have work to do.

What was the first creative experience that wowed you?

It was actually this past June. A friend and I created a show that showcased her talents with set design and mine with music. This was my first intimate show where I sang songs that were super personal to me, so you can imagine how nervous I was. When I was done singing, I opened my eyes to see not only some of my family members crying but also complete strangers. It wowed me because in my mind I was so afraid, and when I opened my eyes after facing that fear, I realized that I had emotionally impacted people through my music, which I think is the ultimate reward any artist can get. Pretty cool, man.

“In my mind I was so afraid, and when I opened my eyes after facing that fear, I realized that I had emotionally impacted people through my music, which I think is the ultimate reward any artist can get.”

What made you want to be a part of the artistic communities in New York and Los Angeles?

Big cities like New York and Los Angeles intrigue me. They are places that some people had their childhoods in, so you’re offered this cool perspective through their lenses. I like to call it the “local’s lens,” but the majority are people from all different cultures and countries who come to these cities to ultimately fulfill their dreams. As a little girl, I dreamed of doing that, so now as an adult, I’m happy to call both these places home, [and to be] constantly surrounded by people doing the same soul work I am.

“In a weird way, my fears inspire me. They’re like these little alarm clocks that go off to remind me that I’m human and I still have work to do.”

What do you celebrate about being a creative?

I celebrate how humans can interact with other humans through ideas. Our ideas become things, but depending on the person, they come out in different mediums, which impacts folks differently. It’s almost like creatives have this secret language in which we share information, which I’d call art.

How are you a part of the underground artistic community on both coasts?

I think I’m part of it by simply living and learning from it. I wake up sometimes in New York, sometimes in Los Angeles, but every time as a better artist. I like to create my own residencies where I go to local art gallery owners, rent all the live performance equipment, and offer a different type of musical experience. Nightclubs and jazz bars are fun, but I always like taking the unorthodox approach for the sake of experimentation.

“You belong here. Don’t let anyone question why you belong here. You just do.”

What are some difficulties you face in your industry?

Being a woman. Being taken seriously as a businessperson. You’re constantly quizzed on the exact information or people you know. It can become a bit frustrating, but in those times I usually tell myself: You belong here. Don’t let anyone question why you belong here. You just do.

What would you recommend to other musicians who are trying to break into the industry?

Be confident in yourself but know what you’re doing. A lot of times I see confident people who know they have what it takes but still don’t go home and study their craft. They assume that “fake it ’til you make it” is an accurate method of finding your way, but fellow artists really respect those who are not only confident in themselves but, if questioned, know what they’re doing and for what. Oh yeah, and have fun too!

the confetti project

What impact do you want to leave on NYC and L.A. culture?

I’d like to just know that I did everything in my power, with no fear involved, to help humanity or make people feel a bit better than they did yesterday. In these cities, a lot of times things become oversaturated and boring, so I want to ensure that what I’m producing is always fresh and fun.


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Jelena Aleksich is a graphic designer and photographer that douses amazing humans with confetti, exploring what they celebrate in their lives. As a creative entrepreneur with a background in Psychology and Design, she is always trying to fuse the two together in creating powerful visual storytelling, which is how The Confetti Project was born. Her few loves: coffee table books, 20-second hugs and doing one thing a day that she is scared of.

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